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The Air Quality Blog by Rabbit Air

Improve Your Home and Your Health

For many proud homeowners across the country, home improvement is top priority on their to-do list. There are several aspects to improving your house such as routine maintenance, renovations, redecoration, upgrades, and other enhancements and accommodations. There are also a variety of reasons homeowners decide to make these changes: they could be health-related, the desire for a change of scenery, a need to be more economical, or simply the urge to take on another engaging project. All of these changes will contribute to an improved quality of life in and around the home – and investing in the right projects and products can be an excellent way to achieve this while saving money.

How Your Home Can Impact Your Health

As homeowners become savvier about the kind of lifestyles which improve health, there are several ways to upgrade the home to make increased well being possible. One way is to improve the cleanliness of the home while reducing germs and pollutants, a critical factor not only for the young and the elderly, but everyone. “Sick house syndrome,” or “sick building syndrome,” is defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a situation in which “building occupants experience acute health and comfort effects that appear to be linked to time spent in a building, but no specific illness or cause can be identified.” It is an illness experienced by Americans across the country who are exposed to various chemicals and sub-par living conditions which are prevalent, yet not always visible, in older buildings or buildings which are not structured to meet basic health standards. The result is that non-suspecting occupants may be exposed to unhealthy levels of carbon monoxide and radon, combustion particles or gases, toxicity from household cleaners, interior mold, and old lead-based paint. Even incense, air fresheners and candles can contribute to potential problems.

Solutions for a Healthier Home Environment

Fortunately, in most cases there are solutions to these problems. Household cleaners can be replaced by homemade, environmentally friendly ones which are cheap and easy to make using basic ingredients like baking soda, tea tree oil, vinegar, alcohol, lemon and toothpaste. Homeowners can also plug in carbon monoxide detectors and have their houses checked for other gases. Qualified professionals can remove asbestos and other toxic materials from the home. There are other simple upgrades which are also effective. Eco-friendly air purifiers can reduce pollutants and other chemicals, as well as improve air quality for people with allergies to dust or animal dander, and those who experience sensitivity to dry or damp air. Natural air purifiers like bamboo, yucca, and other plants are excellent enhancements which also provide an aesthetic appeal. Homeowners may wish to go even further, however, making their homes more green as an approach to improving their immediate environment. This can be effective for a variety of reasons; energy efficiency means effective natural lighting, which provides natural detoxification; energy efficient windows not only insulate well but can be opened to improve air quality and provide coolness; the use of sustainable materials which are non-toxic; and many other improvements add to the overall health factor of the home.

Financial Benefits

The financial benefits of making these changes can be substantial. While initial upgrades at first may seem costly when implemented on a large scale (like installing solar panels for instance), the long-term pay-off more than compensates for the funds initially spent. Homeowners can also enjoy the immediate effects of an improved quality of life due to a healthier environment, which will ultimately save money on trips to the hospital and doctor visits. Smaller improvements – such as investing in Eco-friendly cleaners – will save homeowners on the money spent on more expensive brand names. Making your home a safe, healthy place to live, will not only increase its value on the housing market, but, depending on what aspects of your home you have improved (like upgrading old features and securing safety measures), your insurance premiums can improve. And, of course, it’s important to make sure that the contents of your home are covered too, especially if they are upgrades which are contributing to the overall quality of the home. This means money saved in the long-run, a consideration which often takes its toll on health.

Most importantly, an improved home which is maximized for healthy living will play a hugely positive role, and become a major factor in the health and well being of the homeowners and tenants. A home is, after all, more than a place to stop between commutes – it’s the center of family, the place where memories are made, and where we ultimately spend most of our time. It is a place where we cannot afford to cut corners when it comes to our health and the health of our loved ones.

By volunteer contributor Gemma Hunt

[i] RabbitAir.com. “The Air Quality Blog by Rabbit Air”. Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.rabbitair.com/blogs/air-purifier

[ii] EPA.gov. “Indoor Air Facts No. 4 (revised) Sick Building Syndrome”. Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pdfs/sick_building_factsheet.pdf

[iii] ConsumerReports.org. “Is poor indoor air quality making you sick? Protect yourself against six hidden hazards in your home”. Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/06/is-poor-indoor-air-quality-making-you-sick/index.htm

[iv] GoodHousekeeping.com. “9 Cleaners You Can Make Yourself The key ingredients you need just might be hiding in your pantry” Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/cleaning-organizing/make-at-home-cleaners

[v] EarthEasy.com. “The Top 10 Plants for Removing Indoor Toxins”. Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://eartheasy.com/blog/2009/05/the-top-10-plants-for-removing-indoor-toxins/

[vi] EnvironmentalLeader.com. “Sick Building Syndrome: Is Greening Your Building a Cure?” Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.environmentalleader.com/2012/05/02/sick-building-syndrome-is-greening-your-building-a-cure/

[vii] Realtor.com. “What Homeowners’ Insurance Discounts Are You Missing?” Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.realtor.com/advice/what-homeowners-insurance-discounts-are-you-missing/

[viii] QuoteZone. “Compare contents insurance quotes now”. Accessed January 8, 2015.

http://www.quotezone.co.uk/content-insurance.htm

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Be Aware of Indoor Air Quality

Air pollution affects more than just outdoor air; dirty air can be inside every building you walk into, including your home and workplace. If there is a pollution alert outside, you might decide to stay inside to remain safe. This, unfortunately, doesn’t always help. In fact, your indoor air may be even more polluted than what you’re breathing outside.

What’s In the Air?
Outside, smog, haze, or smog hangs in the atmosphere. If there’s been a fire nearby, there might be smoke dirtying up the environment. Factories near you might be belching out all sorts of irritating pollutants and particulates. Inside your home or office, it’s likely that you’re breathing in harmful substances, too, such as:

  • Formaldehyde
  • Fire-retardants
  • Lead
  • Radon
  • Chemicals
  • Fragrances
  • Dust mites
  • Pet dander
  • Mold
  • Asbestos

How do all these indoor pollutants enter your space? They appear in multiple ways. For example, that new pseudo-leather sofa with its odd smell is releasing chemicals as it settles in. So is the laminate flooring you just had installed in your den. If you have dogs or cats, you already know where the pet dander originated. Your cleaning products also impact your environment, as most conventional cleansers get rid of grime through chemical concoctions.

Ventilation and Other Factors
There are multiple factors that magnify the effects of poor indoor air quality, also referred to as IAQ. Some of them you have more control over than others, for example:

  • Poor ventilation
  • Remodeling dust
  • Humidity levels
  • Leaks from roofs or plumbing

A poorly ventilated building is a surefire recipe for IAQ, as the healthiest spaces are those with free-flowing outdoor air. Remodeling jobs that involve drywall or lumber generate an amazing amount of microscopic dust particles that coat every surface and are inhaled as a matter of course. Low and high humidity levels impact air quality and leaks often lead to mildew and mold.

Modern Times Are Worse for IAQ
Indoor air has become more of a problem in modern times. This is because of several factors.

  • Central Air Conditioning and Heating: Today, our homes and offices have climate control systems that require closed windows and doors.
  • Chemical Cleansers: Many of the cleaning products we buy in the store are laden with harmful chemicals. If you want a spotless carpet or shiny faucet, you usually apply a squirt or sprinkle of air contaminants to accomplish your task.
  • Interior Decorating: More furnishings and flooring products are man-made from artificial materials than in yesteryear. For example, instead of having hardwood floors, homeowners install laminate reproductions. Polyester and plastic have taken the place of cotton and wood.
  • Time Indoors: People spend much more time indoors than they did in the past. This is true of workers on the job, school children in classrooms rather than on the playground, and family life in general (kids playing video games instead of freeze-tag, parents watching TV instead of taking walks).

Health Effects
When humans spend long hours inhaling polluted air, their health is adversely impacted. Many maladies and conditions are directly linked to IAQ, such as:

  • Headaches
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Allergies
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Cancer
  • Eye, nose, lungs, throat irritation

What Can You Do About It?
Happily, there are steps that you can take to improve the quality of your air. To start with, be more aware of what you bring into your home or office building. Here are some actions that can change the IAQ of your interior world:

  • Clean Your Vents: Cleaning the ventilation ductwork of your HVAC systems can make a substantial difference.
  • Open Your Windows and Doors: It’s a wise idea to open up your house or office building to the outside world to invite some fresh air in.
  • Use an Air Purifier: These units draw in dirty air and trap contaminates in a filter.
  • Read Labels: Take some time to read the labels on cleansers and furnishings that you bring into your home or work environment.
  • HEPA Vacuum: You can suck up allergen concentrations in your house by vacuuming with a machine that has a HEPA filter. You can even remove lead and other toxins with this type of vacuum cleaner, especially one with a rotating brush and powerful suction.
  • Mop with Water Only: After vacuuming, mop with plain water. Skip the detergents and just wash your floors with good old H2O.
  • Take Your Shoes Off: A helpful household custom is removing your shoes at the door. This keeps outdoor pollutants out of your household.

Be Mindful
Clean air is one of the things that all living beings need to live healthy lives. You don’t have to shrug your shoulders and accept poor IAQ as a phenomenon of modern existence. By making a few lifestyle changes and being mindful of what you inhale, you can help to improve your health.

Let us help you choose the correct air purifier for your needs. Our knowledgeable, friendly and honest customer service representatives are available to you 24 hours a day. Just contact us or call 888.866.8862.

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The 8 Best Ways to Use Air Purifiers

Using an air purifier can do much more than just improve your indoor air quality; it can also improve the quality of your life. There are many reasons that people find themselves searching for a quality air purifying product, ranging from allergies to eliminating food odors. Here are seven ways you can put an air purifier to good use.

  1. Help Your Health

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, your indoor air quality has a direct impact on your health. The agency lists the following as common side effects of exposure to pollutants:

  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Eye, nose and throat irritability
  • Headaches

The EPA notes that these issues can show up immediately or even within years of exposure.

An air purifier works to do just that: purify the air you breathe. Millions of particles can float throughout your home or business' air, such as mold spores and dust mites, causing the problems that the EPA outlines. The right kind of purifier will filter out these contaminants and eradicate them from your indoor air.

  1. Battle Your Allergies

If you are someone who regularly suffers from seasonal allergies, air purifiers can greatly help reduce your symptoms. While a purifier may not be able to prevent pollen or mold counts from jumping outside, it can keep the condition indoors much more pleasant. These products fight the airborne allergens that are typical in spring and fall.

  1. Cut Down on Dusting

There are likely few people who actually enjoy dusting their homes. Good news for the rest of the population: air purifiers can capture airborne dust particles, preventing them from settling on your television, bookshelves and tables. This will greatly reduce the amount of dust that collects, meaning that you have even less cleaning to do.

  1. Make Your Home Fido-Friendly

You love your pet, but you may not love some of the issues that having a pet can cause. For example, every time your dog wags his tail, he is probably spreading dander, which can trigger allergies and even lead to breathing problems. Additionally, pets can cause unwelcome odors in your home. You can use an air purifier in rooms where your pet spends the most time especially where he or she sleeps. This can help to reduce the amount of hair, dander and odors that circulate throughout your house.

  1. Get Rid of Odors

Cooking fish is a healthy alternative to some of your favorite foods, but it can leave an unpleasant odor hanging around your kitchen or dining room. Aside from cooking, there may be guests, pets, or even your own children who create smells that you wish you could remove with just the wave of a magic wand. Scented candles may work well temporarily, but you are essentially just covering up one smell with another.

Fortunately, an air purifier is up to the challenge. You can combat cooking odors, diaper pail smells and more with just the push of a button. A purifier will actually eliminate the particles in the air that are causing the odor, rather than just covering up the problem.

  1. Fight Germs in the Office

Most people have found themselves in this situation before: You go into work one morning to find that a co-worker is sick but refuses to go home. This means that those germs are circulating through the office and resting on door handles and shared equipment. Check with your supervisor to see if you could add an air purifier to your workspace. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note that having a proper filtration system plays a key role in protecting not only office buildings themselves, but also the people inside. In addition to having clean HVAC systems, it is important to have purifiers to eliminate airborne germs.

  1. Clean the Classroom

Children have a way of bringing home every germ known to man. When they are in school, kids are exposed to a variety of illnesses because they interact so closely with each other. A purifier cannot prevent your child from ever getting sick, but it can greatly reduce the number of airborne particles in the classroom. You can check with the school or the teacher to see if you could donate a purifier to be used in your child’s room.  Air purifiers are also beneficial in the classroom for students that suffer from asthma and allergies. When kids come in from outdoor play, they bring allergens like pollen, mold spores, and dust along with them on their clothes and the soles of their shoes.  Using an air purifier in the classroom can help remove these allergens from the air, helping to reduce allergic triggers and allowing kids to focus more on their schoolwork.

  1. Reduce the Effects of Natural Disasters

A flood or a wildfire can cause major damage and destruction. Even when the situation appears isolated, there are byproducts that stem from these events, including toxins that are released into the air. Flooding can often result in dangerous mold growth, and wildfires emit a host of smoky substances that can make it hard for residents nearby to breathe easy. An air purifier will help to combat the potentially harmful mold spores or smoke particles that could be in your house.

If you are not sure which type of purifier to get, it is best to consult with a professional. He or she can help you to understand which product has the features you need.

Sources:

Environmental Protection Agency, “Indoor Air Pollution and Health,” 2014

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Indoor Environmental Quality,” 2014

Let us help you pick the precise air purifier that fits your lifestyle. Our knowledgeable, friendly and honest customer service representatives are available to you 24 hours a day. Just contact us or call 888.866.8862.

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Who Does Indoor Air Quality Affect the Most?

The quality of outdoor air gets a lot of attention, especially in the media. Individuals and organizations are constantly on a quest to improve air quality and hopefully alleviate many health issues as a result. Although it is important to improve the quality of outdoor air, it is just as important to make sure your indoor air is as healthy as possible by using air purifiers and practicing clean habits. If you think about it, your home is supposed to be a place of refuge and safety from the world, but if your indoor air quality is bad it could cause even more significant damage to your health than outdoor air.

Factors that Affect the Indoor Air Quality
There are many different factors that affect indoor air quality, including cleanliness, environmental factors, pet dander, inadequate venting, presence of mold and other airborne contaminants, and habits of occupants (such as smoking). Some homes have relatively clean indoor air, while others may be full of pollutants that can negatively affect the health of the occupants. Although poor-quality indoor air is unhealthy for everyone, there are some individuals who are much more susceptible to polluted indoor air, including:

  • Individuals with asthma
  • Children
  • Elderly individuals
  • Pregnant women
  • People with cardiovascular disease
  • Smokers
  • Those with compromised immune systems due to sickness, lifestyle, or nutrition deficiencies

Here is a brief explanation of why the first three groups of people on this list are particularly vulnerable to pollutants in the air.

Individuals With Asthma
People who suffer from asthma are more vulnerable to air-borne pollutants because their lungs are already compromised in their ability to function properly in the best conditions. Asthma is a chronic lung disease that causes the airways to become inflamed and narrowed. This leads to mild, moderate, or severe difficulty with breathing. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for people with the most severe forms of asthma to die from lack of oxygen during an asthma attack. If indoor air is filled with pollutants, it can cause further irritation to the lungs and may trigger an asthma attack or worsen the symptoms.

If anyone in your family has asthma, it is very important to keep the air as clean as possible. Air purifiers can help significantly in making the air in your home more pure and safe for asthmatics to breathe.

Children
Children are frequently more sensitive to many different environmental toxins than adults. Some air pollutants may cause children’s lungs to develop improperly, depending on the age of the child and their unique health conditions. Specific pollutants to worry about include tobacco smoke, lead, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, pesticides, and particulate matter. Air purifiers should be placed directly in the bedrooms of children who have asthma, immune system deficiencies, bronchitis, allergies, or any other illness or condition that makes them especially susceptible to air pollution.

Elderly Individuals
People who are age 65 and older are often more vulnerable to a wide variety of illnesses and diseases because their aged bodies do not work as effectively as younger bodies. As the body declines, it is less effective at eliminating chemicals and impurities, which makes older individuals particularly vulnerable to harmful pollutants in indoor air. Older individuals may have a more difficult time recognizing when indoor air is harmful, because they are less likely to experience common effects to irritation from air-borne irritants, including runny noses and itchy eyes.

If your grandparents are living with you, or if you are an older individual yourself, it is advised that you set up at least one air purifier in your home. An air purifier removes impurities and particles from the air and causes them to become trapped in its filter. If you suspect that your indoor air is not as clean as it could be, you should invest in an air purifier as soon as possible.

Let us help you select the perfect air purifier for your needs. Our knowledgeable, friendly and honest customer service representatives are available to you 24 hours a day. Just contact us or call 888.866.8862.

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Indoor Air Quality Impacting Employee Productivity

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, also known as the EPA, indoor air can be up to five times more polluted than the smoggy atmosphere outside. Most people pay attention to the pollution warnings on their local news channels, even staying inside their homes or office buildings in order to stay “safe.” Unfortunately, these individuals may be breathing even more contaminants while spending time in their houses and offices.

 

Chatting Around the Water Cooler

At work, employees might be sniffling, coughing, and even wheezing, but they might not suspect that their office buildings are to blame. Instead, they may gather around the water cooler and blame the weather, the flu, or whatever seasonal plant is blooming outdoors. Some of the symptoms that occur include:

In addition to these ailments, individuals who are inhaling in polluted air-spaces might suffer from limited attention spans and low productivity on the job. This can cost companies that are housed in airtight buildings some big dollars. In fact, OSHA estimates that poor indoor air quality (IAQ) costs employers in the neighborhood of $15 billion in sick leave and poor work performance each year.

 

Employers Take Action

Today, companies are taking action to create a healthier workforce, but their tactics are often missing the mark. Ignoring their indoor air as a cause of employee ailments, employers are focusing on the home life of their employees and instituting wellness programs. These encourage workers to:

  • Eat more nutritious cuisine
  • Exercise regularly
  • Practice stress management

While these practices are certainly beneficial and generally good advice to help improve quality of life, they won’t help to relieve symptoms caused by poor IAQ. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s performed research that showed that an employee’s performance at work can be improved by 10 percent if air quality is cleaned up.

 

Reasons for Indoor Air Pollution

Why is the air inside office buildings so polluted? For one thing, workers are spending much more time indoors than they did in previous eras. Today, an American spends 90 percent of his or her time inside, and there are hazardous pollutants looming in the air, such as:

  • Chemicals in a Work Space: There are chemicals emanating from technological hardware, cleaning products, furniture, and construction materials.
  • Copiers and Printers: Volatile organic compounds, also known as VOCs, are emitted from printers and copy machines.
  • Floor and Wall Coverings: Ozone and tiny particulates are released from flooring materials and wall coverings.
  • Paints and Furnishings: Formaldehyde and toluene are just a couple of the hundreds of VOCs being released from furniture and the paint in a building.
  • Computers and Electronics: These products send emissions into the environment from adhesive, circuits, and plastics. Because computers and electronic gadgetry heat up, the effects are magnified.
  • Pest Control: Most commercial facilities have some sort of weekly or monthly pest control service to kill bugs, and while employees may deeply appreciate a pest-free workplace, these treatments send toxins into the air.

What Can Be Done

Although The World Health Organization estimates the nearly a third of all renovated or new construction has problems with IAQ, steps can be taken to improve the situation. After smoking was banned in American offices, for example, air quality drastically improved. Changes can be made to curtail other pollutants as well, for example:

  • Bring outdoor air in with proper ventilation.
  • Confine networked printers in well-ventilated areas.
  • Use slower print speeds on personal printers.
  • Install an air purifier.
  • Purchase green, low-chemical office products, furniture, and paints.
  • Maintain a stable temperature to discourage condensation and mold growth.

Every step employers take to create a healthier environment for workers can lead to increased productivity and a healthier bottom line. Employees will feel more comfortable and well, which may help prevent them from calling in sick. Small steps can lead to big results, allowing everyone to breathe a sigh of relief.

Let us help you choose the correct air purifier for your needs. Our knowledgeable, friendly and honest customer service representatives are available to you 24 hours a day. Just contact us or call 888.866.8862.

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What Can a HEPA Air Purifier Do For You?

With allergies and asthma on the rise, many people are wondering about the quality of the air they breathe. This is particularly a concern indoors where many people spend the majority of their time. For anybody looking to reverse the effects of poor air quality, a HEPA air purifier may be the way to go.

Why Air Quality Matters
The statistics on air quality and the effects that toxic chemical VOCs have on the body can be startling. Many cities have become known for their high levels of air pollution. What many people do not realize is that indoor air can also be harmful to the body. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that the air quality inside your home can be as much as ten times more polluted than outdoor air. Many people spend a significant portion of their day inside of buildings at their workplace, school, or home. This means that the majority of the air they breathe could potentially be loaded with pollutants.

The American Medical Association, American Lung Association, and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine would all agree that poor air quality puts people at risk. It has been linked to a variety of health conditions, including:

  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Flu
  • Pneumonia
  • Other respiratory infections

There are also concerns about long term exposure to toxins in the air causing an increased risk for a variety of cancers.

With so much at stake, it is important to take a look at the quality of the air that surrounds you and your family in your home. You may decide that some changes are in order. Fortunately, there are good options available for improving the condition of your home’s air. The technology used in air purification systems is constantly improving, and it can be a relief to know that there is help available.

An Air Purifier Acts as Housekeeper for Your Home’s Air
There is only so much a person can do to improve air quality without a purification system. Basic cleaning, vacuuming, and aerating with exhaust fans will not be enough to remove all air impurities. It is possible to monitor carbon monoxide and radon with detectors, but these units also do not remove these toxins from the air.

Air purifiers are an excellent answer. They have the ability to filter out a variety of pollutants before they reach your lungs. They can remove:

  • Dust
  • Tobacco smoke
  • Pollen
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Other gaseous pollutants

Once the particles are removed from the air, they can no longer be inhaled, your family, or your pets. By reducing the level of toxins in the indoor air you breathe, you can rest easy that you have reduced your risks and improved the overall healthfulness of your home. Depending on the severity of your initial problem, you may even notice a difference in the air once you have a system in place.

HEPA Filters Must Meet Very High Standards
A high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter is a particularly powerful type of filter that meets very high standards. The U.S. Department of Energy requires that filters with the HEPA label must be especially efficient. At a minimum, a HEPA filter must remove 99.97% of 0.3 µm particles from the air that passes through it. This is an extremely tiny particle that is the most difficult to filter out.

HEPA filters were first designed in the 1940s, and today they are most often made out of fiberglass. They are designed for maximum effectiveness using multiple techniques for removing pollutants from the air. The particles remain attached to fibers in the filter as the air passes through.

The Many Uses for HEPA Air Purifiers
HEPA purifiers are used in many different settings. These days you can find large ones in homes, medical facilities, workplaces, and other public settings. Smaller systems are used in airplanes, cars, and other vehicles. There are even vacuum cleaners on the market that are equipped with small HEPA purification systems. There are so many applications for these filters because they are so effective and efficient at removing impurities from the air.

Comparing Different Styles
Air purification systems come with a range of features. Some can be operated by remote control. Others are equipped with odor sensors or even have the ability to deodorize as they clean. Some units are designed to be very quiet, which can be especially useful in locations near where people are sleeping. You can purchase models that stand alone, such as in the corner of a room. There are also versions available that mount permanently on the wall.

If you are looking to purchase a HEPA purification system, it is a good idea to assess your needs and then compare the various features available. It is especially important that you consider the size of the space where the system will be located, as different models have different capacities. All HEPA systems meet certain minimum, but in addition each model has an efficiency rating. This will tell you level of air purification you can expect from a particular unit. Some are more powerful than others.

 

Some Final Tips
A representative from a company that specializes in air purification is in the best position to advise you on the system that is right for you. They have the experience to explain the advantages of various HEPA models and to make specific recommendations about which unit will best suit your needs.

For maximum efficiency, it is critical that consumers follow all directions that are specific to the model they choose. Keeping the air purifier running at its best will also require regular maintenance, cleaning and replacing the filters on schedule to ensure a long life for the machine.

There are few benefits to having poor air quality at home. For anybody who wants to help avoid allergy and asthma attacks and reduce the risk of cancer and other long term effects, a HEPA air purifier offers an excellent solution.

 

Let us help you choose the proper air purifier for your needs. Our knowledgeable, friendly and honest customer service representatives are available to you 24 hours a day. Just contact us or call 888.866.8862.

 

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Summer Air Quality

Smog NYWe all know that the hot summer sun can be bad for our skin, but did you know that the air quality during the summer months can pose a health risk as well?  UV rays from the sun are stronger in the summer, causing more ozone to accumulate in the atmosphere and particularly in big cities, heat can cause outdoor air quality to worsen. The calm skies of summer can cause pollutants that have been released into the air to stagnate and hover in the skies, becoming thick layers of smog. This increase in pollution can be potentially harmful to those with asthma, allergies, or other respiratory conditions, often contributing to symptoms or causing reactions.

Keep safe throughout the summer by checking air quality forecasts and planning your outings during the day when pollutants aren’t as concentrated in the air. If you usually exercise or perform strenuous activities outdoors, try something new and workout to a fun video or podcast at home. If you do decide to soak up the sun, try to steer clear of locations that are near freeways or other high-pollutant producing areas like big cities. If you relax indoors to beat the heat, use an air purifier to keep indoor air fresh and clean. Whatever you decide to do this summer, do it with clean air in mind inside your home and out.

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