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The Air Quality Blog by Rabbit Air

How To Clean and Detect Mold

Brian Moloney/flickr

You step inside your home and notice an unpleasant, pungent odor. After making sure you really did take out last week’s trash, you decide that there’s only one explanation: you may have a mold problem.

According to the EPA, mold can create and worsen a number of medical problems, most of which are triggered by their production of allergens. Inhaling or touching mold can elicit allergic reactions, which can include sneezing, red eyes, a runny nose, and skin rashes. Mold can also contribute significantly to asthma attacks.

Even with your emerging suspicions, it’s hard to act against mold — especially at first. Mold reproduces through the expansion of tiny spores that float through the air, and may begin to reproduce inside if its spores land on wet surfaces.

Oftentimes, it can only be found in hidden, hard-to-reach places, like behind walls, beneath wallpaper, inside ductwork, or beneath roofing panels. Despite potential challenges, once you’ve become suspicious of mold, it’s important that you act fast.

Taking Action

Since mold is commonly hidden from view, you have to be diligent about locating its source. Even before looking around obvious places, check parts of your home that get little sun exposure, according to Answers.

It’s important that your investigation be thorough and careful, especially in certain situations — if you discover a great deal of mold growing behind your wallpaper, for example, it’s imperative that you be careful in removing it, as this process, if done hastily, can release a great number of airborne spores.

After locating the source of mold, you must also attempt to restrict the area — this will save you trouble and money down the road.

Covering the moldy region with plastic bags and then fastening them with duct tape will prevent the mold from spreading, and also keep spores from becoming airborne. In minimizing the expansion of the mold, you’ll have an easier time successfully removing it.

Once you do make an effort to clean and remove the mold, you should be sure to use proper equipment. Again, be sure not to let the spores get released into the air, which is difficult to avoid while actively cleaning. It’s good to wear a mask, and you should conduct research on which cleaning agent will be best for your situation.

While cleaning the area, make sure to repeat the scrubbing process multiple times.

Future Prevention

Of course, even after you’ve dealt with your current mold issue, you’ll want to come up with a strategy for avoiding another one in the future. It’s wise to consult a professional about your problem, though many precautions can be conducted on your own.

In general, you’re looking to prevent the expansion of moisture within your home. Whenever something spills, act quickly. You should clean and repair your roof gutters frequently, and make sure the ground slopes away from the foundation of the building so that moisture doesn’t collect around it.

It’s also very helpful to keep the humidity in your home as low as possible. If you can dramatically lessen the amount of moisture in your building, then mold won’t feel welcome any longer. 

The air purifiers offered by Rabbit Air are a fantastic way to start living in a safer, mold-free home. Both useful in preventing future mold outbreaks and fighting against current ones, Rabbit Air’s products also eliminate 99.7% of allergens and pollutants from the air.

Each purifier is designed to adapt to your space and help it to maintain its usual equilibrium. Treat yourself to a mold-free existence with a Rabbit Air purifier.

epaindoor air qualityMoldnegative health effectsrabbit airToxins

Forest Fires and Health

Forest FireForest fires can be more dangerous than you might think. Though the most immediate danger comes from the fire itself, the smoke from a fire can harm people up to hundreds of miles away from the actual blaze. During a forest fire, a number of harmful emissions are released into the air in high concentrations, including small particulate matter, such as carbon monoxide, atmospheric mercury, and volatile organic compounds. As these pollutants are released during a fire, winds can spread them further than one might expect, leaving people unprepared or unaware of the health hazards.  Breathing in these pollutants can exacerbate symptoms for those who have lung or heart disease, and even otherwise healthy people can also be at risk for symptoms, such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and headaches.  The longer one is exposed to these pollutants, the higher these risks can be.

We can all do our part to stop wildfires before they start. When camping, make sure to never leave camp fires unattended and douse them fully with water when you are ready to put them out.  During dry summer days, make sure to keep a close eye on barbeques, bonfires and even lawnmowers – they can create sparks that can ignite dry grass.  When fires do occur, you can protect yourself by checking local air quality reports and staying inside when air quality dips.  It is also advised not to do any indoor activity that will add to pollutant levels if possible. This includes using wood burning stoves, lighting candles, and even vacuuming, as vacuums can throw particles that have settled on surfaces back into the air.  Using an air purifier is the best way to keep the indoor air clean, and if you live in a fire-prone area, consider adding an air purifier with a true HEPA filter before fire season starts so that you know you are protected even before pollutant levels begin to rise.

Air PurifierAir Qualityairborne particlesForest FireHealthHEPAnegative health effectsVOCVolatile Organic CompoundWildfire

Secondhand Smoke Facts and Statistics Infographic

The Negative Health Effects of Secondhand Smoking

A “passive” smoker is someone who inhales the secondhand tobacco smoke generated by others. Secondhand smoke is a mixture of the residual smoke that comes from burning tobacco and the smoke exhaled by a smoker. Exposure to secondhand smoke is thought to be more harmful than smoking a cigarette directly for the same amount of time. The below infographic details statistics about the negative health effects of secondhand smoke.

You are welcome to use this infographic about secondhand smoke statistics on your own website, please link back to this page or www.rabbitair.com as the source.

All of Rabbit Air’s air purifiers are excellent for smoke removal, secondhand smoke, and the odor from smoke. Cigar Aficionado rated Rabbit Air a top air purifier for smokers,  you can read the article on our site. Choosing the best smoke air purifier for your home is a matter of many factors including room size, filtration needs, unit cost, filter replacement cost, etc. Visit our website to learn more about the air purifier models we offer.

Secondhand and Environmental Tobacco Smoke Facts

Mainstream Smoke is the smoke in the air that is exhaled by a smoker.
Sidesteam Smoke is the smoke in the air from a lighted cigarette, pipe or cigar.
Secondhand Smoke (SHS) is a mixture of the 2 above forms of smoke that come from burning tobacco. This is also known as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).

SHS worsens asthma and asthma-related problems in up to 1,000,000 asthmatic children.

The immediate effects of SHS may include: headache, dizziness, eye irritation, cough, sore throat, nausea

Long term effects may include: stroke, asthma, dementia, cognitive impairment, lung cancer, breast cancer, cardiovascular problems

About 3,400 nonsmoking adults die of lung cancer each year as a result of breathing secondhand smoke.

SHS effects on children may include: allergies, olfactory diseases (nasal), circulatory problems, asthma, respiratory problems, behavioral problems, Crohn’s disease, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

An estimated 35,000-62,000 deaths occur annually from heart disease in people who are not current smokers, but who are exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.

11% of children 6 years and under are exposed to ETS in their homes on a regular basis (4 or more days per week)

SHS contains thousands of toxic chemicals including: ammonia, butane, chromium, lead, carbon monoxide, cyanide, polonium, formaldehyde

air purifiersallergiesallergy statisticsasthmaeffects of second hand smokeenvironmental tobacco smokenegative health effectspassive smokersecondhand smokesecondhand smoking

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